Peace Pilgrim: The walking saint

If you asked me to name a modern-day saint, I would name Peace Pilgrim. peace pilgrimFor 28 years, Peace Pilgrim crisscrossed the United States, “walking until given shelter and fasting until I am given food.” She logged over 25,000 miles carrying with her nothing but a comb, toothbrush, pen, correspondence, and slips of blue paper with her message of peace: “This is the way of peace — overcome evil with good, and falsehood with truth, and hatred with love.” Continue reading “Peace Pilgrim: The walking saint”

Joseph Sadony: Explorer of intuition

Joseph Sadony is all but forgotten in spiritual circles. His Gates of the Mind joseph sadonyis now decades out of print and his research laboratories fallen to ruin. His focus was on exploring intuition: to discover its source, develop it, and use it for the betterment of mankind. Long before the New Age movement, he advocated the intuitive human as the next step in our evolution and the salvation of our planet. Continue reading “Joseph Sadony: Explorer of intuition”

Bassui, Huang Po and Foyan: A fearsome Zen threesome

Bassui, Huang Po and Foyan are three ancient Zen masters worthy of your acquaintance.

ancient zen mastersBassui (1327-1387) is a Japanese Zen Master I first encountered in Philip Kapleau’s Three Pillars of Zen. While Kapleau’s book was meant to feature his teacher, Yasutani-roshi, Bassui stands out as truly “a man come back from the dead.” The advice he returns to again and again in his teaching is shown in the following quote: Continue reading “Bassui, Huang Po and Foyan: A fearsome Zen threesome”

John Wren-Lewis: The skeptic’s mystic

John Wren-Lewis lent a fresh perspective to contemporary spirituality john wren-lewisbecause, for many years, he viewed mysticism as escapism. Mystical beliefs were no better than religious or scientific beliefs — to believe was not the same as to know. When, in 1983, Wren-Lewis had a profound mystical experience, he was free to describe it in his own words and not in the terms of any spiritual tradition. Continue reading “John Wren-Lewis: The skeptic’s mystic”

Paul Brunton: A good friend along the way

Paul Brunton died in 1981, so I never met the man, but there was a period Paul Bruntonof time in which I read a number of his books, and found them inspiring. Like the works of Ouspensky, however, I did not continue to find what I needed. I recommend reading a book or two, but don’t expect a complete philosophy. Look at Paul Brunton as a fellow researcher sharing his experiences. He had tremendous knowledge gained from years of travelling the globe and meeting spiritual teachers, yet he never found a final answer. Continue reading “Paul Brunton: A good friend along the way”